Dr. David Mumford

University Professor, Division of Applied Mathematics, Brown University

November 12, 2002
International House, Chevron Auditorium — UC Berkeley Campus

Add to Google Calendar 11/12/2002 11/12/2002 6:00 PM America/Los_Angeles The Mathematical Way of Understanding the World – Clocks and Chaos

About Dr. David Mumford A distinguished mathematician and highly recognized scholar, Dr. David Mumford is a leader in the field of pattern theory. He began his career in pure mathematics, specifically in studying the moduli spaces of curves and algebraic … Continued

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About Dr. David Mumford

A distinguished mathematician and highly recognized scholar, Dr. David Mumford is a leader in the field of pattern theory. He began his career in pure mathematics, specifically in studying the moduli spaces of curves and algebraic varieties. In the past two decades, Mumford has collaborated with computer scientists, psychologists, and neurobiologists and sought the “right” mathematics for describing the problems of perception. His work has focused on computer vision, pattern theory, and the mathematical modeling of shape. His most recent writings include: “Two and Three Dimensional Patterns of the Face,” with Giblin, Gordon, Hallinan, and Yuille (1999), and “Indra’s Pearls,” with Series and Wright (2002). David Mumford was born in 1937 in Three Bridges, Sussex, England, and received his B.A., Magna Cum Laude, in 1957 and his Ph.D. in 1961 from Harvard University. In addition to his achievements as a visiting professor in the U.S., Tokyo, Paris, and the U.K., he served as the Chairman of the Department of Mathematics at Harvard from 1981 to 1984. Mumford was a MacArthur Fellow from 1987 to 1992 and served as president of the International Mathematical Union from 1995 to 1998. Since 1996, he has taught at Brown University. Mumford has received various honorary degrees, awards, and other honors, and is a member of several learned societies, including the London Mathematical Society and the National Academy of Sciences. Mumford received the Fields Medal, the highest honor in mathematics, in 1974.


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