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Jan Morris

Author

November 8, 2000
Zellerbach Auditorium — UC Berkeley Campus

Add to Google Calendar 11/08/2000 11/08/2000 6:00 PM America/Los_Angeles Trieste and the Meaning of Nowhere

About Jan Morris Morris is one of the most prolific and highly regarded writers in the world. She is best known as a travel writer and her books on Venice, Oxford, and Spain continue to sell well 30 years after … Continued

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About Jan Morris

Morris is one of the most prolific and highly regarded writers in the world. She is best known as a travel writer and her books on Venice, Oxford, and Spain continue to sell well 30 years after publication. It was she who effectively set the tone for much of today’s popular travelogue literature, with its quirkiness, atmosphere, cultural curiosity and preference for evocation over actual description. At 26, Morris climbed three-quarters of the way up the highest mountain in the world, and was the first journalist to report the pioneering conquest of Mount Everest by Edmund Hillary and Norkay Tensing. Morris is also a historian, biographer, and novelist. Her Pax Britannica trilogy (1968), an account of the British Empire, was a huge popular success. The atmospheric and passionate The Matter of Wales: Epic Views of a Small Country (1984), however, became one of Morris’s best-selling books; her appreciation for Wales is well documented. She admires the notion of a country only 200 miles from London having its own language, its “unappeasable patriots,” and its apparent sense of grievance and suspicion about England. Jan Morris is an Honorary Doctor of Literature of the universities of Wales and Glamorgan and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature. She resides in Wales.