howi_dretske_111407

Fred Dretske

Professor Emeritus, Philosophy, Stanford University

September 14, 2007 — 4:10 PM
Toll Room, Alumni House — UC Berkeley Campus

Add to Google Calendar 09/14/2007 4:10 PM 09/14/2007 6:00 PM America/Los_Angeles What We See

About the Lecture We see (at least) three fundamentally different sorts of things: objects (a tomato), properties of these objects (the tomato’s size, shape, color, orientation), and facts about them (that is a tomato, that is red). Stanford philosophy professor … Continued

Toll Room, Alumni House - UC Berkeley Campus Berkeley Graduate Lectures lectures@berkeley.edu false MM/DD/YYYY

About the Lecture

We see (at least) three fundamentally different sorts of things: objects (a tomato), properties of these objects (the tomato’s size, shape, color, orientation), and facts about them (that is a tomato, that is red). Stanford philosophy professor Fred Dretske discusses the first: our perception of objects. How many objects do we see in brief but attentive observation? The answer tells us something important about the nature of conscious perceptual experience.

About Fred Dretske

Fred Dretske specializes in epistemology and the philosophy of mind, with an emphasis upon self-knowledge and conscious experience. In 1994, he was awarded the Jean Nicod Prize in Paris, which annually recognizes the contributions of a leading philosopher of mind. Dretske is emeritus professor of philosophy at both Stanford University and the University of Wisconsin, and has served as senior research scholar in the philosophy department at Duke University since 1999.

 


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